Archives for category: — Vintage

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I found this vintage Jeep Grand Wagoneer ad on Pinterest. I have a soft spot for 80s-era, sun-glinting-off-the-hood car ads. The Grand Wagoneer was America’s only luxury SUV until Range Rover hit the North American market in 1987.

In my last post I mentioned the Range Rover Great Divide Expedition. Here’s a video and some more detail about what was probably the coolest 4×4 launch in North America.

Back in 1989 Range Rover had only officially been in the North American market for a couple of years and it’s reputation hadn’t been established here the way it had been in Australia and Europe. So for the launch of that year’s model, with its upgraded, 3.9-liter V8, the company’s North America subsidiary felt it needed to show potential buyers that its new, luxury SUV could climb more than just the hill to the local country club. Read the rest of this entry »

Here’s a nice video of the history of Land Rover from its post-war inception all the way through the Discovery and Freelander models.

It includes footage from vehicle’s famous expedition history as well: the First Overland, London to Singapore Expedition from the mid-1950s; the British Trans-Americas Expedition from the early-1970s, the Great Divide Expedition across the Rocky Mountains in 1989, as well as clips from various Camel Trophies.

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If you’re in the mood for a smorgasbord of vintage, off-road action, check out this 70s-era documentary called Dirt. It covers just about everything from swam buggies to desert racing, and features a RV-ing grampa for a narrator.

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If you can get past the pomp and circumstance, here’s some nice footage of 1930s-era, high-speed rail in action. The film shows The Coronation Scot, an English steam train, reaching 114mph on a test run between the stations of Crewe and Euston.

Put into service in honor of the coronation of King George VI (hence all of the pomp and circumstance) it offered regular service between London and Glasgow, a 400-mile run which it made in 6.5 hours.

Today’s trains make the journey 4.5 hours albeit with less style.

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While up in the Pacific Northwest the other day looking at boats, I took the Black Ball Ferry Line’s classic, 1950’s-era ship, the Coho, from Port Angeles to Victoria, British Columbia. If you’re in the area and need to get yourself and your car over to Vancouver Island, I highly recommend stepping aboard.

While there I saw, on the wall of a building near the ferry terminal, the mural below and thought, “Huh?” The boat looked so weirdly retro-futuristic I wondered if it had ever existed. Indeed it had. A little research when I got home revealed that it was the Kalakala, an earlier member of Black Ball fleet. She was built in the mid-1930s on the hull of a previous vessel, the Peralta, whose super structure had been destroyed in a fire. In her day she was apparently one of the highlights of Puget Sound. Read the rest of this entry »

I like a good bigfoot documentary now and again. Here’s one from the mid-90s hosted by Leonard Nimoy.

Keep an eye out for these guys when you’re out on the trail. 😉

As long as I’m on the subject of Pinzgauers, here’s an early, factory promotional film touting the benefits of the 710 (4×4) and 712 (6×6) models to the tune of a swinging soundtrack.

There’s something so great about vintage, narrated travel films. To make them easier to find on WCXC, I’ve added a new category called “Vintage Video.” It includes all of the vintage overlanding, off-road, and travel videos on the site. To find it, scroll down to the bottom of any page and look for MEDIA > Videos > Vintage or click on “Vintage” in the Category links at the bottom of any Vintage Video post.

Or just click here: Vintage Video on WCXC

Enjoy!

In 1955, six Oxford and Cambridge students set out to travel overland from London to Singapore. The 18,000 mile journey would be the first of its kind. Never before had such a long and difficult route been driven to completion. Men had attempted the London to Singapore route before, making it as far as the middle eastern deserts or the Indian plains, but the mountainous jungles of Assam and Burma had previously thwarted all efforts. In fact, the route was thought to be impassable. Read the rest of this entry »