Archives for category: – River

via WCXCPhoto: Joshua Ashcroft

This summer our friend Josh from Portland headed out on the Barlow Road, just south of Mt. Hood with friends for a bit of overlanding. The Barlow Road served as the last portion of the Oregon Trail.

They managed plenty of river crossings and found an amazing looking campsite on an island mid-stream. Josh’s friend Michael posted about their trip on Medium.com. See the link below.

View the rest of the post for a ton of photos.

Links:
Wikipedia: Barlow Road

Medium.com: Barlow Roading
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This video is amazing. It illustrates how taking a native species out of an environment causes that environment to tilt and list and go off kilter. Put that species back and balance is restored. When wolves were reintroduced in Yellowstone National Park in 1995, everything changed, included the courses of the rivers.

It reinforces my belief that everything’s connected and everything needs everything else.

This process, of a predator changing the behavior of its prey, which then eases pressure on that prey’s prey, and so on down the line, is called a trophic cascade.

Audio is taken from a talk given at TEDGlobal 2103 by environmentalist George Monbiot .

Check the links to learn more.

Links:
TED Radio Hour: Everything is Connected
(listen to the show here)
Wikipedia: Trophic Cascade
Yellowstone National Park

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This video, Overview, documents the idea that seeing an overview of the earth from space has been a consciousness-shifting event for the astronauts that experienced it and, one hopes, for humanity itself. Seeing the fragility of the earth from space really brings home the understanding that we’re all in this together.


Photo: Gregory McDonald

Our goal for the third day of our trip was to reach the intersecting forks of the Van Deusen River, in the Six Rivers National Forest, southwest of Ruth Lake. I figured we might find a good campsite there. So, at about 10:30am, we broke camp and left our site at 22N63 behind. Read the rest of this entry »


I went on a nice little solo trip up to the Sierra Nevada this past summer, found some great back country camp sites, and thought I’d share them with you. Keep these in mind for next summer when the snow clears.

See the map at the end of the post for exact locations. Read the rest of this entry »

On the road again heading through Arizona.

Photo: Natalie Menacho

In the first half of June Natalie and I got on the road again for our first big trip of the year. We were headed to the Southwest, land of painted deserts and amazing canyons. Our plan was to get to Taos, New Mexico, as quickly as possible, then head slowly back to Sonoma County and see what we could along the way. On our first night we made it to Barstow. We asked the woman at the motel what drove the Barstow economy. She said, “People trying to get to somewhere else.”

The next morning, on our way to do just that, I didn’t fill up the tank, thinking gas would be cheaper on the highway. I was wrong. It kept getting more expensive the further into the desert we got. And then, after a while, there simply weren’t any more gas stations. Just as I was about to reduce our speed to make the most of our dwindling fuel, a gas station appeared like an oasis — I think it was even called Desert Oasis. Saved! Except that gas was $5.00 a gallon. OK, half a tank then. $50 later, we were back on the road. In Needles, California, right on the Arizona border, I filled up the rest of the tank at something like $4.89/gallon. As soon as we crossed into Arizona it was something like $3.89. D’oh. Read the rest of this entry »


This is a flashback post that I wrote before WCXC, back in 2006. 🙂

Last summer I decided to take my 170,000-mile, 1986 Isuzu Trooper for a month-long, solo road trip from California to British Columbia and back. I was looking forward to the thrill of the open road, clear-blue water, wildlife, and remote wilderness, so I prepared well, packing my tent, my gear, and a month’s worth of food into the Trooper in case I got stranded and needed to wait for the Mounties, a passing husky team, or whoever handles that sort of thing in Canada.

I’m glad I did. Despite a snag or two, I learned a few things and returned to tell the tale. Not everything in the wild is so lucky.

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Last week my girlfriend, Natalie, told me about the Greenbelt Movement, an organization founded in the 1970s by Wangari Maathai to combat deforestation and soil erosion in Kenya by training women to plant trees. According to a radio piece on Living on Earth, the movement has dramatically improved water quality and habitat for both animals and people.

Well, in a couple of weeks Natalie is going to help improve the environment a little closer to home by participating in the Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation’s Tree-a-Thon. The goal is to plant between 500 and 1000 trees, and other native plants, around the laguna, which is located here in Sonoma County just north of Sebastopol.

If you’d like to sponsor Natalie in support of the Tree-aThon, and the birds, fish, and river otters that call the laguna home, here’s a link where you can donate.


View Larger Map

Whether you’re coming up to West County for the weekend or moving here for good, here’s a map of some of my favorite spots.

Click “View Larger Map” below the map to the left to read all of the descriptions. Enjoy!


We just got back from Southeast Asia. Our entry and exit point was Bangkok—what a city. Old, new, fashionable, and traditional, all mix together in this city on the move. Street vendors can be found everywhere selling anything from pad Thai and grilled chicken skewers to knock-off, Spongebob Squarepants carry-on luggage. Whole restaurants pop-up, makeshift-style, down random alleys. We even saw women at sewing machines, doing tailoring, right there on the sidewalk. Throw in some grit, a few stray dogs, boats speeding up and down canals in a black fog of diesel fumes, and you’ll have a pretty good picture of Bangkok.

Oh, don’t forget the heat. It’s hot, hot, hot, and humid. We averaged three to four showers a day and—I’m sorry to say—my deodorant still couldn’t keep up. That said, I think Bangkok is fantastic. It’s one of the most vibrant, engaging cities I’ve ever seen. Here are a few tips, if you go.

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