Archives for category: – Store

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If you happen to be on Orcas Island in the San Juans this week, check out Pop-Up Print Shop. It’s a pop-up silkscreen shop that sells t-shirts and prints on paper.

Most of the designs are mash-ups of vintage, royalty-free, line art. It’s good stuff and the shop is only open another week.

Pop-Up Print Shop, 109 North Beach Rd., Eastsound, Washington Read the rest of this entry »

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While we were in Seattle, Natalie found an amazing fabric store called, appropriately enough, Seattle Fabrics. They specialize in fabrics for outdoor, recreational, and marine use. Want to make your own sleeping bag? They have the patterns, nylon, fill, zippers, and notions. If the bag ever gets ripped, they sell sealer with which you could repair it. Want to make your own parka? They have patterns for that too.

They had braided line, elastic line, elastic line with reflective thread. Their notions section (buckles, snaps, D-rings, etc.) filled a whole wall. They had ripstop nylon, marine canvas, duck canvas, camo, gortex. Pretty much whatever you’d want. I’ve never seen a fabric store more geared to the how-to, outdoor enthusiast.

If you happen to pass though Seattle, check out there store at 8702 Aurora Avenue North or find them online at the link below.

Link trail: Seattle Fabrics

More photos of this great store below.

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If you have a project you’re working on that requires fabric, have a look at the Harts Fabric website. We dropped in to their store in Santa Cruz, California, and were impressed by the plaid, cotton twills, the ripstop nylon, and the selection of duck canvas on hand.

They were very helpful and have a large selection of well-priced off cuts. This is a great resource for outdoor fabrics. Read the rest of this entry »


In a store on the Mendocino coast specializing in African products, we came across this stylish, toy Land Rover complete with roof rack and tiny jerry cans. It was made in Malawi, in southern Africa, entirely out of river reeds. Like so many other goods from Africa, this model was made from what was available. On the shores of Lake Malawi, it turns out, river reeds are what’s available in abundance.

This little truck measures a respectable 14″ long, by 6″ wide, by 11″ tall, and can be ordered for $48 from Ananse Village in Fort Bragg, California. Read the rest of this entry »

If Koh Phi Phi is a gorgeous, late-night-partying supermodel, Koh Lanta is her cool, super-chill cousin, perhaps not as magazine-cover gorgeous but still quite pretty and charming to boot. Instead of dodging paparazzi and partying until 4am, she just wants to hang out, grab breakfast, and maybe check out some cool shops on the way to the beach. Koh Lanta, with its super-relaxed Thai-beach-town vibe, turned out to be the perfect spot to end our vacation. Read the rest of this entry »

After a couple of flights and a brief overnight at the very nice Phuket Backpacker Hostel, we boarded a boat for Koh Phi Phi, Thailand’s stunning tropical beauty in the Andaman Sea. Of course, the word about Phi Phi had long since gotten out. As we disembarked into the heat from the air conditioned deck, we joined throngs of people streaming down the pier and were immediately absorbed into a sea of backpacks, luggage, and Thai men hawking hotel rooms.

Tonsai Village, the heart of Koh Phi Phi Don (the main island) is a dense area of small shops, bars, and restaurants served by streets no wider than a city sidewalk. There’s not a car or scooter in sight. When the boats come in, they turn into rivers of tourists. It was all a little overwhelming, so the first thing we did was sit down and have a pizza.

With lunch finished and the crowds cleared, we felt fortified enough to look for a place to stay, so we slung on our backpacks, and headed out to see what we could find.
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We just got back from Southeast Asia. Our entry and exit point was Bangkok—what a city. Old, new, fashionable, and traditional, all mix together in this city on the move. Street vendors can be found everywhere selling anything from pad Thai and grilled chicken skewers to knock-off, Spongebob Squarepants carry-on luggage. Whole restaurants pop-up, makeshift-style, down random alleys. We even saw women at sewing machines, doing tailoring, right there on the sidewalk. Throw in some grit, a few stray dogs, boats speeding up and down canals in a black fog of diesel fumes, and you’ll have a pretty good picture of Bangkok.

Oh, don’t forget the heat. It’s hot, hot, hot, and humid. We averaged three to four showers a day and—I’m sorry to say—my deodorant still couldn’t keep up. That said, I think Bangkok is fantastic. It’s one of the most vibrant, engaging cities I’ve ever seen. Here are a few tips, if you go.

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Lately cheap products have been getting me down. I find myself longing for the well-made, the time-tested, the things that last. As it happened Natalie and I came across an antidote to the cheapening of the consumer landscape on our most recent trip to Idaho: Elko General Merchandise in Elko, Nevada. Quality is all they have.

Walking into the store is like walking into another time. Boots, hats, gloves on shelves and tables, no fancy merchandising systems, the whole place is honest, satisfying simplicity. We checked out knives in a display case and the friendly shopkeeper pulled our selections from a drawer. Natalie picked out an Old Timer pocket knife for planned whittling projects and bought me a Dakota #38 folding knife. Both the gift and the shopping experience were such a treat.

I wish the store well. It’s definitely worth a look if you’re passing through Elko.

To read another blog post on this place, and see some photos, follow the link. More on our Idaho trip to come in future posts!

Elko General Store post at One Trip Pass

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My artist’s rendering of our night siting.

It was around 4am, mid-September at the South Yuba Campground northeast of Nevada City. Natalie and I were sleeping happily. Then nature called (both of us—I guess it was a conference call). As we headed out into the chilly night air to take care of business, I said, “Hey, look, there’s Jupiter.” Fairly low on the horizon, east-southeast of us floated a bright white light. “Wow, it’s really twinkling.”

“It looks green,” observed Natalie. “Yeah, I does look like it’s twinkling green,” I said, struck by the brightness of it. I can’t remember exactly how it went from here. I think Natalie said, “It looks like it’s moving.” I looked again. “Oh my God, it does. It’s totally moving.” And we watched through the trees as this blinking, twinkling thing hovered and moved, paused and moved again. Read the rest of this entry »