Archives for category: SKILLS

If you have a Jeep and haven’t done this upgrade, keep reading. This wiring harness enables your truck to send power directly from the battery to the headlights via a couple of relays instead of routing the electricity into the dash and through the light switch. In Jeeps I’ve been told routing the electricity through the switch robs a lot of power and causes dim headlights.

In this excellent video from YouTube user BleepinJeep, he finds that this $25 upgrade more than doubled the light output from his stock headlights. That was even better performance than he got from his upgraded LED lights on the new harness (and the LEDs didn’t put out enough heat to keep themselves free of snow). He takes you through the whole install.

You can get this harness from a place called K Suspension Fab but they were backordered at the time of this post. Here’s a link where you can find it on Amazon. That link is for H4 headlights. Check first to see what kind of headlights you have.

Thanks to my good friend Nathan for the tip!

The overlanding worlds’s favorite sometimes-prickly off-road expert, Andrew St.Pierre White takes you on a deep dive into the realm of 4×4 driving skills in this full-length, vintage video. Driving in all terrain types is covered, as well as driving a classic 4×4 set-up and how it differs from more modern, computer-controlled 4x4s.

Here’s quick and strong way to splice two wires, the linesman splice. Brought to you by Canadian workshop guru and avid YouTuber, AvE.

And an image for quick reference.

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It’s spring and you’re probably getting ready for a camping trip or two. In case you’re wondering what to bring, I’ll share our camp list, our checklist for everything we bring.

First though a word on how we pack. I have a drawer system in the truck and a lot of the tools and recovery gear live in there. In the flat area above the drawers we have room for three plastic bins (like the ones in the photo above) and one cooler. That makes four solid items that can easily be strapped down. Always secure your load inside the vehicle. You don’t want that stuff shifting on the trail, or worse, flying around in an accident. All of the soft stuff (blankets, sleeping bags and the like) go between the space left over along side the bins. Usually I can get us packed and still see out of the rear window.

For longer trips, I take out the back seat of the truck and bolt a couple of D-rings to the floor of the truck where the seat bolts go. In that space, low and central, I’ll strap down 21 gallons of water in 3 plastic jugs. That’s enough for a maximum of 10 days for my wife and I at a rate of 1 gallon per person per day for drinking, cooking, and dishes.

You can see one of the water containers in the picture below. Read the rest of this entry »

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Photo: Paul Guillien

As you’re prepping for rides this spring and summer, it might be worth having a look at these adventure bike tips compiled by four-time Baja 1000 champion Quinn Cody for the website ADV Pulse. He covers planning, prep, gear, as well as riding tips. Good to know.

Link:
Quinn Cody’s Off-Road Safety Tips for Adventure Riders » ADV Pulse.

How cool is this? What a great trick to add to your list of camp kitchen skills. Give it a try during your next off-road adventure. Greg, I’m looking at you! 🙂

Thanks to my lovely wife, Natalie, for the tip!

I’ve published a few Fire Skills posts in the past to give readers a few options in making their evening camp fires. We’ve experimented with a few fire set-ups in order to see which ones last the longest. The set-up in this video from Sigma 3 Survival School is claimed to burn for 40 hours. That’s quite a claim.

Their technique is to build a pyramid fire (each layer’s tightly spaced logs are a little shorter, a little thinner, and laid perpendicularly on the logs underneath). Their winning tip is to pack the gaps between the logs with dirt or clay. If you do this for every level, the embers won’t be able to fall down and ignite lower levels of wood prematurely.

Even if it doesn’t last 40 hours, this looks like a good candidate for at least an all-night fire, something we’ve never been able to manage with previous campfires. Next time we’re going to give this a try.

Here’s a beautiful video showing how a Damascus steel knife is hand forged. The blade gets folded and hammered flat over 300 times. The sheath is handmade too. Gorgeous video.

I’ll admit I didn’t know there was more than one way to lace up a hiking boot. This video shows techniques for really locking the boot to your ankle to prevent heal chafe, as well as different lacing styles for people with high arches or flat feet.

My feet are slightly different sizes so I love the idea of getting a more custom fit depending on how I lace up. Good stuff.