Archives for category: —Montero

Here’s an interesting video of a group of friends off-roading in the Nevada desert. Three of the guys bring Gen2 Monteros to the party. Another brings a Gen3. The last brings a G-wagen.

A couple of things interest me about it. For one, we get to see how two generations of Montero stack up against each other and the G-wagen in tricky, slippery, sometimes off-camber, terrain. And two, it reminds me that skills count as much, if not more, than equipment. Practice makes perfect.

I really like this German review of the second generation Montero/Pajero. The Gen2 Montero (1991–1999) represents, for me, the sweet spot in the line-up: modern creature comforts, off-road capability, and relative simplicity. I drive one and really enjoy it.

The video does a great job showing all of truck’s features. The only downside is that it’s in German. Since I speak German though, I did learn a couple of things. For example, the Gen 2 Montero has a viscous coupling between in the axles in 4H (all-wheel drive) mode. That means that even though the center diff. isn’t engaged, power will still be transmitted to both axles should a wheel on one axle lose traction. Of course, the center diff. can be locked in 4HLc (4×4 mode). Another thing, the rear seat armrests are height adjustable. Who knew?

Also featured is footage of the short wheelbase Montero, which I don’t think was available in the U.S.

Link:
Wikipedia Montero/Pajero article

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All photos: Gregory McDonald

Our friend Greg at continues his Lost Coast adventure on his blog, gadmachine, aside from being a top-notch adventurer, he’s very good at getting very close to very large animals. This bull elk basically walked into his camp at Usal Beach.

More photos after the jump.

Read the rest of this entry »

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If you follow this blog, you’ve probably seen our good friend, Greg. He and Natalie and I trucked through the Sierras together, following in Mark Twain’s footsteps. He also joined us on the California Backcountry Discovery Trail last year. You may even have seen his nicely modified Mitsubishi Montero on this blog.

Well now Greg has started his own blog. It’s called gadmachine. Besides having a penchant for adventure, Greg’s a great writer and an excellent photographer. I think you’ll enjoy his site.

Check out his first trip post about exploring California’s Lost Coast. Here’s Part 1 and here’s Part 2. Or read more of this post to see some of my favorite photos from Greg’s Lost Coast trip.

Link: gadmachine

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WCXC: Vintage Land Cruiser Ad, FJ40

If you’re interested in vintage Land Cruiser brochures, ads, manuals and articles from around the world, there’s a veritable treasure trove over in the IH8MUD forum. Check out this post.

The post covers the classics: FJ40, FJ55, and FJ60. There are also some lesser-known models. Blizzard, anyone?

Check out the rest of this post for a good-sized set of my favorites, like a nice Red Poly FJ60 with white steel wheels, for example. Good stuff! Read the rest of this entry »

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If you haven’t already seen it, there’s a great 1st generation Montero / Pajero build by Expedition Portal forum member, Cruisn. He delves into everything: turbo-diesel engine swap, new interior, custom storage solution, on-board air, rooftop tent, lift, and more.

He’s posted lots of off-road pictures to boot. It’s definitely worth a look.

Mk1 Tourer build-up – Expedition Portal.

This video nicely illustrates how picking the right line can make all the difference.

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For the last couple years or so my 4-wheel-drive system has been engaging intermittently. Normally I’d shift the transfer case lever into 4 High and the green lights in the instrument cluster, indicating the status of the front wheels, would blink (four-wheel drive engaging), then go solid (in four-wheel-drive). In the last couple of months though, the lights wouldn’t stop blinking, a sign that the system wasn’t able to engage the front axle.

I had ordered the factory shop manuals for the truck a while back, so I decided to see if I could fix it myself. Also, my mechanic explained to me that my Gen 2 Montero engages 4-wheel-drive by connecting the right-front axle shaft to the front differential by means of a vacuum-powered actuator. (That’s different from the Gen 1, which has auto-locking hubs.) Armed with that knowledge I looked up the actuator in the manual and noticed that it recommended greasing the actuator rod.

I got under the truck, removed the skid plates, pushed aside the rubber boot and saw that the grease, where the rod entered free-wheeling clutch housing (red arrow), was old and jelly-like. I cleaned out the old crud, packed it with fresh grease, reattached the boot, and left the whole thing sit while I reinstalled a pair of marker lights in the bumper.

When I took the truck for a test drive an hour later and shifted into 4 High, the indicator lights flashed briefly, then immediately went solid. Whoo-hoo! An easy fix!

I recently had a set of ARB locking differentials installed in the truck and it was irritating that I had this great new gear and yet the basic four-wheel-drive system wasn’t working. That made this quick fix all the more satisfying.

Update 02/04/2015

This situation came up again recently. I think water crossings may be a factor since the boot on the actuator rod isn’t water tight. Again, I cleaned out the old grease, sprayed WD-40 to drive out any water, then re-greased both ends of the rod. It’s working again.

I also found this link helpful:
http://www.pocuk.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=87530&highlight=actuator+rod

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A few months ago I thought it would be cool to convert my turn signals and brake lights to LEDs. I had seen them on my friend Greg’s truck and I liked the crisp on/off quality. I thought it updated the look of the truck and, of course, LEDs use much less power and last practically forever. In this post I’ll tell you everything you need to know to make the switch to LEDs, and I’ll also tell you why I opted not to do it, for now. Read the rest of this entry »

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I drive about 20,000 miles per year and my 1995 Mitsubishi Montero gets about 18 mpg. At current gas prices, which hover just over $4 per gallon in my neck of the woods, that’s a fuel bill of about $4500 per year.

I recently saw that Smart Cars are available for lease for $99 a month. This got me thinking. If I leased a Smart Car, which gets about 36 mpg, and drove it most of the time, say 18,000 year, at current gas prices the fuel bill would come to $2025 per year. Add in $1200 for the lease, and $450 for the remaining 2000 miles of fuel for the Montero and the total is $3675. I’d come out almost a $1000 ahead for the year, use less gas, and save wear and tear on the truck to boot.

If we weren’t buying a sailboat, I’d seriously consider it.