Archives for posts with tag: 4-wheel-drive
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All photos: Gregory McDonald

Greg on his way to Overland Expo 2015

Dear Readers!

I apologize for the radio silence the past few months. I’d like to get the WCXC ball rolling again with series of posts about last spring’s Overland Expo 2015. I had initially invited my good friend Greg from gadmachine to go with me. When a scheduling conflict came up, Greg, always up for adventure, accepted our press pass (kindly provided by Overland Expo) and headed to Arizona solo. He had a great time, met some great people, and took the fantastic photos you see here.

I’ll cover the Expo in four posts: Trucks, Products, Camp Vibes, and the Obstacle Course.

Next year’s Overland Expo will be held May 20–22, 2016 in Flagstaff, Arizona. The event offers a chance to work on your overland driving skills, attend workshops and classes, watch films and demos, and offers a tangible air of camaraderie. They’re already taking reservations. If you’re interested, click here.

On to the trucks! The Expo is a great place to see adventure vehicles. Here’s what Greg spotted. Read the rest of this entry »

A couple of weeks ago I dropped by Thorson’s Off-Road in Santa Rosa for a quote on a new skid plate. We got to talking and I was given a quick tour of the shop. They were prepping an insane looking Jeep for the King of Hammers, a 165-mile desert race in which teams must blast through open terrain at 100+ mph and also negotiate difficult, slow rocky sections.

The week-long event takes place in Southern California near Twentynine Palms, features motorcycles and buggies, and starts on Friday, January 30th. The main event takes place on Friday, February 6th.

See the rest of the post for links and photos of Thorson’s crazy Jeep.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Rubicon Trail is one of the toughest in the country. Though some of the most truck-destroying obstacles have reportedly been made less trecherous in recent years, the trail is still a grueling, 12-mile challenge. If you’re interested in tackling it, check out this video review from Terraflex. It’s one of the first I’ve seen that gives a good overview.

This is a 10-out-of-10 difficulty trail. Stock trucks can make it with difficulty but should expect damage. According to the video, 35″ tires, lockers, and 3″ of lift could be considered baseline for making through without undue stress.

If you do go, do your research, and don’t go alone. I’ve included some links below to get you started.

Thanks to Greg from gadmachine for suggesting this video.

Links:
Rubicon Trail Foundation (vehicle and general prep.
)
County of Eldorado (trail conditions)

WCXC: Rookies on the Rubicon (a 7-part series on this site of man’s first time on the trail)


There’s a great post on the Expedition Portal Forums about a guy and some friends that do some overlanding through Idaho’s Bitterroot Mountains and the Morrison Jeep Trail in Northwestern Wyoming. Early on they suffer the consequences of some deferred maintenance (in dramatic fashion) but get truck home, fix it, and get back out on the trails.

The photos are amazing.

Link:
The SOS Report on Expedition Portal

 

 

I’m not usually into guitar-heavy videos, but this one of BJ Baldwin winning the 2013 Baja 1000 is pretty awesome. The way his truck flies across the top of some of the whoops seems to defy physics. And the music is pretty decent halfway through.

Here’s a five part video from YouTube user Mark Doiron about their 2011 trip through Moab, Utah, and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.

Part 1 (Ridgeway, CO to Murphy on White Rim Trail in Canyonlands NP)
Part 2 (Murphy to Caineville, UT)
Part 3 (Caineville, UT to Batty Caves in Grand Staircase-Escalante)
Part 4 (Batty Caves to Lake Powell)
Part 5 (Lake Powell to Grand Canyon north rim)

See the rest of the post for the all the videos.

Read the rest of this entry »

via WCXCPhoto: Joshua Ashcroft

This summer our friend Josh from Portland headed out on the Barlow Road, just south of Mt. Hood with friends for a bit of overlanding. The Barlow Road served as the last portion of the Oregon Trail.

They managed plenty of river crossings and found an amazing looking campsite on an island mid-stream. Josh’s friend Michael posted about their trip on Medium.com. See the link below.

View the rest of the post for a ton of photos.

Links:
Wikipedia: Barlow Road

Medium.com: Barlow Roading
Read the rest of this entry »

57-0

There’s only one day left on this Mat Tracks-equipped Pinzgauer 710M. The seller states the Mat Tracks alone are a $35,000 upgrade. The tracks would make this truck unstoppable in deep snow. The original wheels and tires are said to be included. Paint is also said to be new. Mileage: 50,000 (km, I’m assuming).

The truck is listed on ebay with a Buy-it-now price of $27,500, and is located in Marathon, Florida.

More photos after the jump.

Link:
Pinzgauer 710M for sale on ebay Read the rest of this entry »

This is pretty nutty. I’ve gone some crazy places but I’ve never driven through a mine. The poster writes that the action takes place on the Gold Rush Trail in British Columbia.

It seems super dangerous. It’s an amazing video though, if you don’t mind the music.

Left-foot braking means applying the brake with the left foot while your right foot is on the gas and the car is moving forward. It’s one of the most important skills I’ve learned. It makes progress over rocks and obstacles much smoother by reducing suspension movement as tires come off of obstacles. Chassis impacts with said rocks and obstacles are thereby also reduced.

Imagine a tire going over a rock. Even pressure on the throttle makes for a smooth climb to the top of the rock. Even pressure on the brake makes for a smooth descent down the other side. Gas and brake at the same time covers all of your bases, as some tires may be climbing while others descend.

There’s a second benefit. In a vehicle with open front and rear differentials (most 4x4s) getting into a crossed-axle situation (in which one wheel on each axle has lost traction) will halt forward movement. Squeezing the brake while keeping your foot on the gas can reduce wheel spin in the lost-traction wheels and transfer torque to the wheels with grip. In my experience though, this doesn’t work if the truck is up against big obstacles. That said, if you happen to get cross axled on a rutted but flat road, it’s a good trick to have up your sleeve.

This video does a good job of explaining both scenarios. If you haven’t already, practice left-foot braking the next time you’re out on the trail. Your smoothness over obstacles will be like night and day. Once I learned, I wondered how I ever got by without it.