Archives for posts with tag: Montero

Here’s a nicely modified Mitsubishi Pajero / Montero set up for overlanding the Australian outback. It’s got everything you could ever want in a vehicle and then some.

This is another German Pajero (Montero) video, this time of the Gen 1 model. I like seeing this period videos of the trucks in action.

One of the interesting things they say is that, at the time, Mitsubishi had been participating in the Paris-Dakar Rally since 1983.

Here’s footage of a Gen3 Mitsubishi Pajero/Montero tackling the very rutted Powerline Track in New South Wales, Australia. In this video the brake-actuated, limited slip system looks like it’s doing a job of getting the truck through some rough, wheel-in-the-air terrain. Nice to see.

Here’s an interesting video of a group of friends off-roading in the Nevada desert. Three of the guys bring Gen2 Monteros to the party. Another brings a Gen3. The last brings a G-wagen.

A couple of things interest me about it. For one, we get to see how two generations of Montero stack up against each other and the G-wagen in tricky, slippery, sometimes off-camber, terrain. And two, it reminds me that skills count as much, if not more, than equipment. Practice makes perfect.

I really like this German review of the second generation Montero/Pajero. The Gen2 Montero (1991–1999) represents, for me, the sweet spot in the line-up: modern creature comforts, off-road capability, and relative simplicity. I drive one and really enjoy it.

The video does a great job showing all of truck’s features. The only downside is that it’s in German. Since I speak German though, I did learn a couple of things. For example, the Gen 2 Montero has a viscous coupling between in the axles in 4H (all-wheel drive) mode. That means that even though the center diff. isn’t engaged, power will still be transmitted to both axles should a wheel on one axle lose traction. Of course, the center diff. can be locked in 4HLc (4×4 mode). Another thing, the rear seat armrests are height adjustable. Who knew?

Also featured is footage of the short wheelbase Montero, which I don’t think was available in the U.S.

Wikipedia Montero/Pajero article

All photos: Gregory McDonald

Our good friend Greg managed to get these amazing photos of bull elk while he was camping at Usal Beach on California’s Lost Coast. He estimated he was no more than 10 yards away for the close ups. Amazing!

Thanks, Greg!

More photos below. Read the rest of this entry »


If you haven’t already seen it, there’s a great 1st generation Montero / Pajero build by Expedition Portal forum member, Cruisn. He delves into everything: turbo-diesel engine swap, new interior, custom storage solution, on-board air, rooftop tent, lift, and more.

He’s posted lots of off-road pictures to boot. It’s definitely worth a look.

Mk1 Tourer build-up – Expedition Portal.


For the last couple years or so my 4-wheel-drive system has been engaging intermittently. Normally I’d shift the transfer case lever into 4 High and the green lights in the instrument cluster, indicating the status of the front wheels, would blink (four-wheel drive engaging), then go solid (in four-wheel-drive). In the last couple of months though, the lights wouldn’t stop blinking, a sign that the system wasn’t able to engage the front axle.

I had ordered the factory shop manuals for the truck a while back, so I decided to see if I could fix it myself. Also, my mechanic explained to me that my Gen 2 Montero engages 4-wheel-drive by connecting the right-front axle shaft to the front differential by means of a vacuum-powered actuator. (That’s different from the Gen 1, which has auto-locking hubs.) Armed with that knowledge I looked up the actuator in the manual and noticed that it recommended greasing the actuator rod.

I got under the truck, removed the skid plates, pushed aside the rubber boot and saw that the grease, where the rod entered free-wheeling clutch housing (red arrow), was old and jelly-like. I cleaned out the old crud, packed it with fresh grease, reattached the boot, and left the whole thing sit while I reinstalled a pair of marker lights in the bumper.

When I took the truck for a test drive an hour later and shifted into 4 High, the indicator lights flashed briefly, then immediately went solid. Whoo-hoo! An easy fix!

I recently had a set of ARB locking differentials installed in the truck and it was irritating that I had this great new gear and yet the basic four-wheel-drive system wasn’t working. That made this quick fix all the more satisfying.

Update 02/04/2015

This situation came up again recently. I think water crossings may be a factor since the boot on the actuator rod isn’t water tight. Again, I cleaned out the old grease, sprayed WD-40 to drive out any water, then re-greased both ends of the rod. It’s working again.

I also found this link helpful:


There are some great trip reports over on the Expedition Portal Forums. Here are a couple of highlight photos from a guy who posts under the name “Sabre.” He and his wife took an overland trip from their home in Washington state to the southwest. The photos and scenery are stunning. And they did the whole trip in a stock Gen 3 Montero.

Link: Backcountry Trip to Utah Sells the Wife on Overlanding Read the rest of this entry »

Last year marked the 30th anniversary of the Mitsubishi Montero/Pajero. I don’t know much about the current 4th generation Montero — it’s not available in the States — but my favorite is still the 2nd generation, produced 1992–1999, and known to enthusiasts as the “Gen 2.”

I got a message on the site recently asking me what I like about it. Here’s the short answer.

It’s a capable truck for my needs, i.e., exploring moderate trails (no rock crawling) for a week or two at a time. I like the design of both the interior and exterior better than I did that of the 80-series Land Cruisers. I also like its part-time 4-wheel-drive system. I can run in 4-high, 4-low, 2WD, or 4-high with an open center diff (all wheel drive). The ability to switch into 2WD allows the Montero to get about 19 mpg on the highway which, while not great, is better than the 12–14 mpg I would have gotten in the Land Cruiser.

Also, I love driving a stick and the base model Gen 2 Montero was available with a 5 speed. That sealed the deal. I think it was the only mid-1990s, domestic SUV which had that option.

The Gen 2 Montero is the best-balanced SUV I could find. It makes a good daily driver and it’s never let me down on the trail.

Thanks for the video, Greg!