Archives for posts with tag: off-roading


There’s a great post on the Expedition Portal Forums about a guy and some friends that do some overlanding through Idaho’s Bitterroot Mountains and the Morrison Jeep Trail in Northwestern Wyoming. Early on they suffer the consequences of some deferred maintenance (in dramatic fashion) but get truck home, fix it, and get back out on the trails.

The photos are amazing.

Link:
The SOS Report on Expedition Portal

 

 

The Ford Bronco in this video is a remote control, 1/9th-scale model. It was hand built, out of wood, by Headquake RC Creations, which seems to be a guy working happily in his workshop in rural Ontario, Canada.

The level of detail is amazing—the miniature driver has foam arms and looks like he’s steering—and it’s fun to watch them roam their magically out-of-scale worlds. There are more videos after the jump.

Links:
Headquake’s YouTube Channel

Headquake’s Facebook page

RCCrawler: Forum post in which he talks about his process
First spotted on Offroad Action

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Here’s a video about a guy who builds a camper shell on the back of his Jeep Comanche to go off surfing in bigfoot country… and then escape. That’s part 2, which is after the jump.

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Here’s an interesting video of a group of friends off-roading in the Nevada desert. Three of the guys bring Gen2 Monteros to the party. Another brings a Gen3. The last brings a G-wagen.

A couple of things interest me about it. For one, we get to see how two generations of Montero stack up against each other and the G-wagen in tricky, slippery, sometimes off-camber, terrain. And two, it reminds me that skills count as much, if not more, than equipment. Practice makes perfect.

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There’s only one day left on this Mat Tracks-equipped Pinzgauer 710M. The seller states the Mat Tracks alone are a $35,000 upgrade. The tracks would make this truck unstoppable in deep snow. The original wheels and tires are said to be included. Paint is also said to be new. Mileage: 50,000 (km, I’m assuming).

The truck is listed on ebay with a Buy-it-now price of $27,500, and is located in Marathon, Florida.

More photos after the jump.

Link:
Pinzgauer 710M for sale on ebay Read the rest of this entry »

Here’s another short film from Adam Riemann, the guy who rode 7,000 kms through seven countries on a KTM 500EXC. In this video he hails the glories of the 2-stroke in the the form of the KTM 300EXC. It’s amazing how quickly covers rugged terrain on this bike. He goes over boulders and through streams like it’s a ride in the park. And some of the jump footage is just spectacular.

Enjoy.

This is pretty nutty. I’ve gone some crazy places but I’ve never driven through a mine. The poster writes that the action takes place on the Gold Rush Trail in British Columbia.

It seems super dangerous. It’s an amazing video though, if you don’t mind the music.

Left-foot braking means applying the brake with the left foot while your right foot is on the gas and the car is moving forward. It’s one of the most important skills I’ve learned. It makes progress over rocks and obstacles much smoother by reducing suspension movement as tires come off of obstacles. Chassis impacts with said rocks and obstacles are thereby also reduced.

Imagine a tire going over a rock. Even pressure on the throttle makes for a smooth climb to the top of the rock. Even pressure on the brake makes for a smooth descent down the other side. Gas and brake at the same time covers all of your bases, as some tires may be climbing while others descend.

There’s a second benefit. In a vehicle with open front and rear differentials (most 4x4s) getting into a crossed-axle situation (in which one wheel on each axle has lost traction) will halt forward movement. Squeezing the brake while keeping your foot on the gas can reduce wheel spin in the lost-traction wheels and transfer torque to the wheels with grip. In my experience though, this doesn’t work if the truck is up against big obstacles. That said, if you happen to get cross axled on a rutted but flat road, it’s a good trick to have up your sleeve.

This video does a good job of explaining both scenarios. If you haven’t already, practice left-foot braking the next time you’re out on the trail. Your smoothness over obstacles will be like night and day. Once I learned, I wondered how I ever got by without it.

4x4-driving

I recently added Four-by-four driving to my book collection. If you’re not already familiar with previous editions, they’re classics in 4×4 circles. The newly revised 3rd. edition was released this year.

The book starts by defining the basics 4×4 systems in plain, conversational language: differentials, the basic types of 4-wheel-drive systems, and then goes into detail describing the different systems used by 12 different manufacturers—including (in this edition) makers of “soft roaders,” i.e., Freelanders, Rav4s and the like. This is extremely handy for slicing through marketing jargon. What does Quadra Track or 4-matic really mean? This book tells you.

The book then goes into off-road driving techniques for various types of terrain, addresses recovery, advanced techniques, expedition basics, and finishes with how to load a truck.

It’s informative, well-photographed and well-illustrated. My only criticism is that sections of the book, and page numbers, are both numbered in a decimal format (i.e., 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 for chapter 1; 2.1, 2.2 for chapter 2 and so on) and Section 7.2 isn’t on page 7.2, for example, which can get confusing because the book frequently references other parts of the text. Was that Section 7.2 or page 7.2?

That said, it looks like quite a good “do it all” book, explaining both how our rigs work and how to use them. New copies are available solely through Desert Winds Publishing.

Links:
4×4 Driving from Desert Winds Publishing
Jonathan Hanson’s full review of the 2nd. edition, on Overland Tech & Travel

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Australian off-road motorcycle racer Chris Hollis enjoys a relaxing day at home in New South Wales, piloting his KTM around the back forty. Pay close attention at 0:36. That’s a nice move.

I like seeing a guy ride with this much speed and skill. Well done. And well shot by Shane Fletcher. The music is M83, “We Own the Sky.”