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Here’s an interesting find: a right-hand drive, short wheel base, 70-series, diesel Land Cruiser. Specifically, this is a 1988 BJ74 LX with a 3.4-liter, 13B-T (T for turbo) diesel engine and an automatic transmission. The 13B-T is good for 120 hp and 159 lb-ft of torque. Other highlights include a removable fiberglass top, a factory PTO winch, and a hand throttle (handy for operating the PTO).

This truck also sports a Safari Snorkel and a K&N filter. If you’re interested, double check that pairing. As far as I know, it’s one that Safari doesn’t recommend. The suspension is said to be an Old Man Emu system with a bit of lift. The BJ series was never sold new in North America, making this a relatively rare find, especially with the factory PTO setup.

While this Land Cruiser doesn’t look pristine — and the chrome bull bar is bit much for my taste — it does look presentable and clean underneath. The truck is located in Seattle, Washington, and is said to have 178k miles on the clock. $13,750 is the asking price. See the links for the original ad and some research reading.

Special thanks to our friend Josh in Portland for spotting this one.

More photos after the jump.

Links:
1988 Land Cruiser BJ74 Craigslist Ad

Toyota Vehicle Hertiage site: Land Cruiser 70-Series

More 70-Series Land Cruiser research

Wikipedia: Toyota 70-Series

Wikipedia: The Toyota B engine

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EarthCruiser announced last Fall that it would begin building its self-contained, go-anywhere, ship-anywhere trucks in the U.S., and this week the first one is ready for delivery.

In case you’re not familiar with it, the EarthCruiser is a highly capable, 4×4 expedition vehicle. The idea is that you can drive it to a remote place, pop the top, and be self sufficient. It can draw water from a stream, purify it, heat it (via the Webasto diesel heater), store it, and deliver it to you via the sink or the indoor or outdoor shower. The heater will also heat the insulated interior. There’s a stove, a fridge, even a queen-size bed.

With a little help from the solar panels topping up the house batteries, you can stay in a spot for up to ten days without running the engine. On the other hand, if you need to leave in a hurry, you can lower the top from inside the cabin and be on your way in minutes.

The EarthCruiser is built on the Mitsubishi Fuso light truck chassis. Power comes from an intercooled, 4-cylinder turbodiesel. This DOHC, 16-valve powerplant will produce 295 lb.-ft. of grunt at just 1,300 rpm. A six-speed, dual-clutch, automated manual transmission handles gear selection for you. The 4×4 system consists of manually locking hubs and single-speed transfer case. There’s no center diff. While you might have wished for a two-speed transfer case, EarthCruiser assured us that first gear is pretty low and will get you through just about anything.

Additional gear such as A/C, a winch, an extra fuel tank, driving lights, and a few other things, can be fitted at your request, although it’s ready to go in standard trim at $215,000. Give them a call. They’d be happy to build you one.

For more photos from Earthcruiser, and from our recent trip to Earthcruiser’s Facility in Bend, Oregon, see the rest of the post.

Links:
EarthcruiserUSA
Previous Earthcruiser post on WCXC

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