Archives for category: GEAR

It’s pretty amazing that aerial adventure footage is now within the grasp of non-professionals. Are you itching get some amazing follow shots of your truck on the trail? Here’s a brief look at some of the systems on (or coming to) the market.

Find a video about the Inspire One after the jump.

Links:
Inspire One drone, $3000
18 minute flight time, fully gimbaled, 360-degree camera

Airdog drone, $1295
10–20 minute flight time, auto-follow enabled

Hexo+ drone, $1199, attach your own GoPro
15 minute flight time, auto-follow enabled

Zano, $265
10–15 minute flight time, auto-follow enabled

Read the rest of this entry »

In this video the Australian guys from All 4 Adventure show off the mods to their Toyota Land Cruiser 200-Series ute, which include front and rear winches, extra lithium batteries, bumpers, lights, air compressors, an updated electrical system and suspension, and some cool storage solutions.

These guys were involved in a recovery rollover a while back while trying to get a truck out from a rising tide. The video is quite hairy and is a good illustration of how problems can compound, if you’re not careful. It’s worth a watch.

Link:
Recovery Goes Seriously Wrong

If you’ve ever gone duck hunting or skeet shooting, you know the joy of a nice shotgun. Well, Holland & Holland, the English gun-maker founded in 1835, takes the craftsmanship of a “nice” shotgun to a stratospheric level. A single, hand-built gun can cost £60,000 to £100,000 (~$40,000 to $66,000) and that’s not including luxury engraving, which can double the price. Time from order to delivery? Two to three years.

The video above shows the painstaking level detail that goes into each gun. They manufacture bolt-action rifles as well, should you be so inclined.

Pour yourself a glass of single-malt, sit back, and enjoy.

Links:
Holland & Holland
What it’s like to visit Holland & Holland’s New York Gun Room
Wikipedia page

Iwatani stove, via West County Explores Club

My friend Greg from gadmachine, who’s an avid home and camp chef, pulled out this cool little camping stove on a trip last summer. It’s a Iwatani butane-powered, single-burner stove. This particular one (Model ZA-3HP) puts out 12,000 BTUs and costs about $35. They make another version (Model 35FW) that puts out 15,000 BTUs that costs about $80. For comparison a standard, propane Coleman camp stove will produce 10,000 BTUs per burner.

That extra heat is great for searing steaks. You can even use it indoors, so it can do both camp and home kitchen duty. Greg says they’ve been making them forever in Asia and really have the design nailed down. People seem to love them.

They both come with carrying cases and might make great gifts.

Links:
Iwatani 12,000 BTU stove on Amazon, and Central Restaurant Products
Iwatani 15,000 BTU stove on Amazon, and Central Restaurant Products
gadmachine tumblr

 

Here’s a beautiful video showing how a Damascus steel knife is hand forged. The blade gets folded and hammered flat over 300 times. The sheath is handmade too. Gorgeous video.

I’ll admit I didn’t know there was more than one way to lace up a hiking boot. This video shows techniques for really locking the boot to your ankle to prevent heal chafe, as well as different lacing styles for people with high arches or flat feet.

My feet are slightly different sizes so I love the idea of getting a more custom fit depending on how I lace up. Good stuff.

Herock Pallas work shorts. via West County Explorers Club

Check out these work shorts from Belgium. They have 16 pockets. They repel dirt and liquids. The front pockets can be pulled out to hang externally and easily hold tools or small parts, or can be tucked in like normal pockets. High stress seams are double or triple stitched and the pocket corners are bar tacked for durability.

They seem like perfect overlanding shorts. Available for $74.50 at a company called Lee Valley.

Link:
Lee Valley, Herrock Pallas Shorts

WCXC on Pinterest

Although I haven’t been so great at keeping on the blog lately (though I will be changing that), I have been good at keeping my Pinterest account up. And through a fluke of nature (which was Pinterest recommending one of my boards to new users), I now have over 20,000 followers. Whoa.

If you like your overland, off-road, camp, and adventure information in bite sized chunks, check out my Pinterest page. I have boards on camping, truck mods, Land Cruisers, Land Rovers, Skills, and a bunch of other stuff too.

If you haven’t checked it out yet, you’ll probably dig it.

Links:
Here are all of the WCXC boards.

And here are all of the pins.

The CARB-compliant gas cans we get here in California can be difficult to pour and are generally a pain in the butt. Here’s how to mod one to make it easy to pour and still remain leak free.

A guy in the auto mechanics class I’m taking recently told me about a smart phone-based scan tool app called Torque. Scan tools are the devices you plug into your car or truck’s OBD or OBD2 diagnostic port to display engine trouble codes, a handy thing to have if you’re working on your own truck. (Trouble codes are generated by the vehicle’s computer when the check engine light goes on.)

Besides reading trouble codes, the app can display all kinds of vehicle information on your phone or tablet in real time: mass air flow, boost (on turbocharged cars), coolant temp, fuel flow, the list goes on. And, because it’s running on a smart phone, it can also display things like pitch, roll, GPS position, and compass heading. The app even has a function that will record video of the road ahead, through the phone or tablet’s camera, while overlaying vehicle data into the frame. Pretty cool.

The video gives a good overview. Things start getting interesting around 4:06.

All you need to make it work is the app, which is $5, and a Bluetooth scan tool, which plugs into your OBD2 port. These can be found on Amazon for about $23. (The OBD2 port has been required on vehicles since 1996, though cars a year or two earlier may be equipped with it. Older cars have the OBD port, which unfortunately won’t work with this system.)

Self contained scan tools can cost hundreds of dollars and don’t have as much functionality, one of the many reasons that the Torque app and a Bluetooth scan tool make such a compelling package.

Check the links for a CNET review, the app, and the bluetooth scan tool.

Links:
CNET: Monitor your car’s performance with the Torque app for Android

Google Play: Torque Pro Scan Tool app

Amazon: BAFX Bluetooth OBD2 Scan Tool
(this one is compatible with Android only)