Archives for category: — Vintage

I like a good bigfoot documentary now and again. Here’s one from the mid-90s hosted by Leonard Nimoy.

Keep an eye out for these guys when you’re out on the trail. 😉

As long as I’m on the subject of Pinzgauers, here’s an early, factory promotional film touting the benefits of the 710 (4×4) and 712 (6×6) models to the tune of a swinging soundtrack.

There’s something so great about vintage, narrated travel films. To make them easier to find on WCXC, I’ve added a new category called “Vintage Video.” It includes all of the vintage overlanding, off-road, and travel videos on the site. To find it, scroll down to the bottom of any page and look for MEDIA > Videos > Vintage or click on “Vintage” in the Category links at the bottom of any Vintage Video post.

Or just click here: Vintage Video on WCXC

Enjoy!

In 1955, six Oxford and Cambridge students set out to travel overland from London to Singapore. The 18,000 mile journey would be the first of its kind. Never before had such a long and difficult route been driven to completion. Men had attempted the London to Singapore route before, making it as far as the middle eastern deserts or the Indian plains, but the mountainous jungles of Assam and Burma had previously thwarted all efforts. In fact, the route was thought to be impassable. Read the rest of this entry »

This is an early-70s documentary I’m watching at the moment called “Bigfoot: Man or Beast.” The film offers the opinions of both believers and skeptics, and follows a group of researchers in the Pacific Northwest as they try to catch a glimpse of one of these creatures. The film cites a string of evidence dating back to 1811 (and further back in Native American lore) as proof that there really is a population of bipedal, humanoid apes alive and well in the wilds of North America.

It even shows on-screen interviews with men who had early, now-famous, encounters in the 1920s. One reported being carried off by a bigfoot while on a prospecting trip in British Columbia. The other retells of a night he and other prospectors were attacked by a group bigfoot in Washington (after shooting at one, the film neglects to mention). It’s fascinating stuff.

Robert Morgan, the main researcher in the film, went on to write the Bigfoot Observers Field Manual offering practical advice for those interested in seeing one of these creatures up close. My girlfriend, Natalie, gave me a copy and it’s a very interesting read. He reports the creatures to be curious but wary and very clever.

Anyway, enjoy the film. It features some nice shots of vintage Land Cruisers, and a smokey, pre-EPA, tracked buggy, in action.

Watch the rest of the movie after the jump. Read the rest of this entry »

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Here’s a video about a bunch of guys that in 1978–79 took six stock Jeeps from Cape Horn, at the tip of South America, to Prudhoe Bay, at the top of Alaska. They called their 21,000-mile, 120-day trip the Expedición de Las Américas. The video, which is actually really great, comes complete with tough-guy narration and a goofy, 70s soundtrack that extols the virtues of being guided by rainbows.

As they leave South America, however, they’re in for some serious terrain. They must cross the Darien Gap, 200-miles of jungles and swamps that separate Central and South America. (Today it’s half as long.) One of their non-rainbow guides put it nicely: the Darien Gap is not something to be conquered but something to be experienced. I’m paraphrasing, but you get the idea.

This video is also something to be experienced: almost half-an-hour of vintage, Camel Trophy-worthy expedition.

Read the rest of this entry »

This fantastic Land Cruiser promotional video from the early 1980s, called Getting Through, demonstrates various driving skills filmed throughout Australia. It features footage from sandy beaches to snowy mountain tops and covers the following:

Rocky terrain
River crossings
Beach and dune driving
Winch anchoring
Snow driving

The tips and techniques (many of which were new to me), and animated illustrations are excellent. The vintage TV-detective-show soundtrack and mustaches are hilarious.

Very informative, very entertaining, and highly recommended.

Part 2 is below. Read the rest of this entry »

Here’s a great, National Geographic-style film about three men that, in 1940, attempted to drive what appears to be a stock Plymouth sedan from Washington D.C. to the tip of South America, along what was to become the Pan-American Highway.

In 1940, however, many parts of the road were nothing more than rugged mule trails. The men had to often drag their car (or have it dragged) over mountain passes and through rivers. It’s hard to believe they undertook the journey without the benefit of 4-wheel drive, a low-range transfer case, high-clearance suspension, or even off-road tires. When they weren’t on the trail, they were meeting dignitaries and reporting on culture and development. It’s charmingly civilized.

This film, Rough Road to Panama, chronicles the first half of the expedition. The companion film, Rugged Road to Cape Horn, which I have yet to find online in its entirety, covers the second half of the trip.

Read the rest of the entry to see parts 2 and 3 of Rough Road to Panama.

Hey, the video still of Part 1 looks like part of our logo. 🙂

Hat tip to Christian at Expedition Portal for posting that site’s forum.

Read the rest of this entry »

What vehicle did the overland-savvy Australians take with them on a year-long research expedition to Antarctica in 1963? A Land Rover? A Toyota Land Cruiser? No, they took a practically bone-stock VW Beetle.

It looks almost comically unassuming next to the hard-core Swedish Snow Trac seen in the background of one of the shots in the film but the humble Beetle reportedly held its own against the harsh, icy terrain.

There you go, the Type 1 Beetle. The most popular car in the world and the first production car on the Antarctic continent.

Read the rest of this entry »

Do you ever wonder how exactly a differential works? We all have a rough idea, but for a well-explained breakdown of the concepts, check out this instructional film from the 1930s. I think you’ll be hard-pressed to find a clearer explanation. Read the rest of this entry »