A short but beautiful video of 75,000 hp icebreakers from Russia rescuing icebound ships in the arctic.

Last year my wife gave me these Caterpillar-branded, LED work lights and I want to recommend them because I think they’re great. These 500-lumen work lights run on four AA batteries and have an 8-hour life on low power. The best thing about them though is that they’re magnetic. When I check the oil on the truck at night I take one out of the back and pop it under the hood. It’s such a joy to have the engine bay so well lit. They’re also great for sticking to the side of the roof rack as area lights for when we arrive at a remote camp at night. They’ve made a good addition to the truck.

They’re available for about $34 on Amazon. There are other versions (not CAT-branded) that are plug-in rechargeable. Reviews on those are mostly good.

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In this video a Volvo C304 owner talks about finding this truck in a field and rebuilding it. Great off-road footage to boot. Short and sweet.

If, like me, you miss the days when car stereos had actual knobs for adjusting bass and treble, and didn’t look like they were styled for the interiors of spaceships, you’ll probably appreciate Blaupunkt’s re-release of their classic Bremen head unit. The original was offered as a tape deck in 1986. The updated version offers media slots and ports under a door where the cassette slot used to be.

The unit, officially known as the Bremen SQR 46 DAB, comes equipt with Bluetooth, an SDHC slot, two USB ports, and is iPhone/iPod compatible. On the downside, the screen is same size as it was in the ’80s but display and lighting color is customizable. So nice to have dedicated knobs and buttons. And so nice to see a car audio product with such a handsome, understated design.

Like most things with understated good looks, they don’t come cheap. The Blaupunkt Bremen will set you back about 450 Euros (about $495). Read the rest of this entry »

In 1939 a 55-foot-long, 37-ton snow vehicle with a planned 8,000-mile range was deployed on Antarctica to explore the continent. It was called The Snow Cruiser. How did it fare? Not so well. If you saw my post from a couple of weeks ago, you know how it’s done today.

What happens if you break your winch rope out on the trail? Here’s how to fix it.

 

Maxtrax are often the first thing overlanders grab when they get stuck. They’re easy to deploy. Just do a bit of digging and stick them in front of the wheels. A set will cost you about $300, which seems like a lot for two injection-molded plastic planks. Have you ever wondered if knock-offs are a viable alternative to an original set of Maxtrax? The verdict seems to be favorable according to this video.

Here’s a fascinating look at how supplies travel across the Antarctic, pulled in sled trains by Pistenbully snowcats. Each sled train weighs between 50 and 100 tons. There’s an interesting bit at the end showing how they store all of the supplies over the winter once they reach their location.