Archives for posts with tag: 90s

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While driving around the Pacific Northwest last week, looking at boats, we spotted this nice, mid-1990s Toyota 4×4 Pickup. I don’t know anything about it except that it looks clean and stock. For a nearly 20-year-old Toyota 4×4, that’s saying something.

The other interesting thing is that it’s located in Point Roberts, an odd little little piece of Washington state that’s connected to Canada, instead of the rest of the United States. The only way to get to this 4-square-mile hamlet, with its own border crossing, is to drive through our neighbor to the north or take a boat.

If you’re interested in the truck, the number’s on the windshield. I posted another picture and a map after the jump. Read the rest of this entry »


All photos: Gregory McDonald

I’d been wanting an extra margin of water fording safety and a cleaner intake source than under the fender well, so I ordered an ARB Safari Snorkel. A couple of weekends ago my friend Greg — awesome guy that he is — came up to help me install it. It worked out pretty well and took about 5 or 6 hours from start to finish (including a trip to the hardware store for last minute supplies).

If you install one yourself here’s a list of things you’ll need. Read through your instructions fully before you go to the hardware store to get supplies. I didn’t, hence the extra trip.

Apart from the standard tools, you’ll need:

• an 86mm (3-3/8″) hole saw (this may be different for your truck)
• Loctite
• drills up to 1/2″ diameter (the instructions call for larger but if you follow this method, you won’t need them)
• silicon sealer
• ratcheting box wrench (to tighten the nuts inside the fender well without removing the fender)
• a step drill, if you already have one (they’re about $50 so I just used a series of drills)

Here’s the biggest tip of the whole exercise: use the template only to drill the big, 86mm hole. Mark the small, snorkel bolt holes as well but use the bolts themselves to determine their exact positions. The template may not be accurate — it wasn’t for us. Use the same method for determining the positions of the A-pillar holes and you’ll be dead on.

Be sure to follow along with your instructions, if you do this yourself. I’m only going into a general level of detail in this post.

Read the rest of this entry »